Larger peppers, such as Anaheim, poblano, and Hatch, take well to roasting, which removes chiles’ thick skins, softens their flesh, mellows their heat, and adds a delectable smoky element.

How to roast. Dampen and wring out a clean kitchen towel; set aside. Place chiles over a very hot flame (gas burner or outdoor grill) or a few inches under a broiler. Turn with tongs until completely blackened on all sides, 15–20 minutes. Wrap in the towel to steam 10 minutes; then use the towel or your hands to slide off charred skins. Slit chiles to remove seeds and membranes for less heat.

Stuffed. Fill roasted chiles with scrambled eggs and feta or jack cheese; broil briefly and serve with chopped fresh tomato and avocado.

Corn bread. Chop roasted chiles and add to your favorite corn-bread batter, along with fresh corn kernels, for a smoky-sweet hit.

Green chile. Sauté onions and garlic in olive oil (or bacon fat); then add chopped chiles (preferably a mix), vegetable or chicken stock, and cilantro. Serve with chips and pico de gallo.

Roasted Chile and Onion Sauté (Rajas)
Serves 4/ This simple mixture makes a delicious quesadilla or taco filling. View recipe