This month I challenge you to take a little time for yourself. For some, my request may seem next to impossible, with work and family obligations tugging at you every moment of every day.

I sympathize. Believe me, I've been there. But truth be told, you really can't afford not to take the time to relax. According to researchers, if you're stressed out, you can actually weaken your immune system and make yourself sick. Recent studies have linked stress to all sorts of nasty conditions and diseases, including poor digestion, depression, heart disease, and diabetes.

So do yourself a much-deserved favor this October by nurturing your body and refreshing your spirit. We make it a snap in our story " href="http://www.deliciouslivingmag.com/magazine/index.cfm?fuseaction=article&articleid=2069" A Day for You," which offers 25 ideas—from nutritious recipes and soothing spa treatments to creative activities—for relaxation, revitalization, or detoxification, depending on what you need on your chosen "me" day … or hour, or moment. Whatever amount of time you can manage will make a difference. My personal goal is to start as many mornings as possible this month with warm water and lemon—an Ayurvedic detoxification treatment—and to continue my before-bed ritual of winding down after a long day with a lavender-infused bath.

Don't miss our special women's health coverage in this issue, too.

"On Fertile Ground" reveals the sometimes subtle diet and lifestyle tweaks that women—and their mates—can make to improve their chances of getting pregnant. And in "Balancing Act," we report on the latest research about three effective herbs that relieve menopausal symptoms, such as hot flashes and mood disturbances.

Also, this month marks the debut of a new holiday: HerbDay. The celebration on Saturday, October 14, will feature educational events, such as lectures, herb walks, cooking demos, herbal handcrafts, and more, across the country. Check out www.herbday.org for more information and a listing of events in your neck of the woods.



Pamela Emanoil Bond
Editor in chief