EGCG

The cells of frequent tea (Camellia sinensis) drinkers may have a younger biological age, according to recent research, which showed that telomeres–the DNA sequences at the end of chromosomes that shorten with age–remained longer among tea drinkers. Tea’s antioxidants, such as EGCG, which is one of green tea’s most potent antioxidants, may be to thank for protecting telomeres from age-related oxidative damage. Recommended dose: One to three cups tea daily or 70–100 mg EGCG daily

Multivitamins

New research reported that people who regularly took multivitamins had longer telomeres, indicating biologically younger cells. Multivitamins’ antiaging effects could be a result of antioxidants such as vitamins C and E, which fight oxidative damage and inflammation. Recommended dose: One multivitamin daily, including 400 IU of vitamin E (as mixed tocopherols) and 500 mg of vitamin C

Omega-3s

Essential fatty acids in foods such as wild salmon and flaxseed support heart, brain, and joint health and may also help prevent arthritis, diabetes, depression, and cancer. New research supports the use of omega-3s for decreasing dementia risk, promoting longevity, and protecting against cellular aging. Recommended dose: 1,000 mg of purified fish oil up to three times daily Caution: May cause an upset stomach and increase risk of bleeding

Resveratrol

An antioxidant produced by grapes to defend themselves against fungus and disease, resveratrol may increase cognitive function and help prevent cancer, stroke, and cardiovascular and Alzheimer's diseases. Recommended dose: 25–100 mg trans-resveratrol