Supplementing your diet may never be more important than in your later years.

Recommendation

Rationale

Notes

Calcium
750 mg 2x/day

Strong bones depend on calcium.

Take with magnesium (400 mg/day) so the calcium does not replace magnesium in the body. Calcium carbonate is constipating; many older people find calcium citrate easier to tolerate.

Folic acid
400 mcg/day

This B vitamin promotes heart health and reduces blood clotting factors.

Folic comes from foliage. Get folic acid from dark green vegetables, bananas and oranges.

Selenium
50­200 mcg/day

An antioxidant trace mineral, selenium suppresses free radicals, which contribute to cell aging and cancer.

Selenium is toxic in large doses, but beneficial in small doses.

Vitamin A
5,000 IU/day

This antioxidant suppresses free radicals, which contribute to cell aging and cancer.

Vitamin A is found in liver, cod liver oil, egg yolks and whole milk. Beta-carotene, a precursor of vitamin A, is also beneficial and is easy to get from yellow, orange and red fruits and vegetables.

Vitamin C
500 mg/day

This antioxidant suppresses free radicals, which contribute to cell aging and cancer.

Vitamin C may help boost the immune system and support recovery after surgery.

Vitamin D
400 IU/day

Vitamin D helps maintain strong bones.

Sun exposure helps the body produce vitamin D. Recent studies indicate that larger doses of vitamin D are safe; the conservative upper limit is 1,000 IU/day.

Vitamin E
15 mg/day

This fat-soluble antioxidant may protect against heart disease and some forms of cancer.

Best food sources are monounsaturated fats (avocado, nuts and olive oil).

Sources: PDR for Nutritional Supplements (Medical Economics Co., 2000); Natural Therapeutics Pocket Guide by James LaValle (Lexi-Comp, 2000).